A day to honor presidents


The third Monday in February has been designated as the day to honor those who have served our nation in its highest elective office.
President’s Day grew out of two February holidays, honoring George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, considered by many to be two of the nation’s greatest presidents. It was changed to give all presidents a share of the honor.
Forty-four men have served in the nation’s highest office. All have left their mark on the nation in one way or another - many for the good things they did, others for things that didn’t work out so great.
All of them entered office with the highest of ideals - to serve their nation and help make it a better place. There will always be those who disagree with what a president does. That is an important part of living in a democracy.
Many believe in recent decades there has been a growing rush to demonize a president with whom you disagree. Some say it was started by liberals during the Reagan presidency. Others point to the constant investigations that surrounded the Clinton presidency and the large amounts of money spent investigating him.
It seems that to become president, a good share of the population must consider you to be “dishonorable.”
This type of attitude is not constructive and does little to move new ideas forward in government. Instead, it hardens both sides and leads to inaction and a refusal to compromise. When neither side is listening to the other, very little gets done. It’s time for our leaders to go beyond that and begin working together.
By doing that you honor all presidents, and all others who have served their nation.